https://education.alberta.ca/media/7792655/learning-and-technology-policy-framework-web.pdf

Alberta, Canada really did a nice job of setting up their Learning and Technology Policy Framework. I like how it states so many different forms of technology, and included guidelines for the Bring-Your-Own-Device B.Y.O.D. As the rate of speed that technology is changing, and has changed in the past 20 years, the school districts have to update their technology at a faster rate, and the next generation will have to be more creative with how they present technological information. It looks like a lot of research went into putting the framework together. I can’t even begin to imagine how many hours of meetings it took for them to create such a guideline for Alberta. It is also intriguing how they place such value on Student Centered Learning, and expect the students to weave their way through the internet to get to the end means of what they wanted to learn. There is so much information available to students at the tip of their hands, and they don’t even have to sit in a traditional classroom, they could take classes from their own computers, anywhere, anytime. I’m glad to know that students who take ownership of their learning are more successful in life. That is something that I could see would be beneficial even to rural students in Alaska.

http://www.nsbsd.org/site/handlers/filedownload.ashx?moduleinstanceid=780&dataid=445&FileName=2014FinalTechnologyPlanNoSigPages.pdf

I could see some similarities between the Alberta Technology, and Learning Framework, and the 2015-2019 NSBSD District Technology Plan, “Technology: Expanding and Enhancing Instruction.” The only slight difference that I noticed was that the North Slope Borough School District’s plan places more emphasis on local culture by incorporating lessons using the Inupiaq Learning Framework to create lesson plans, which teachers put a lot of research into to create a local curriculum that allows students to utilize technology to keep their rich heritage, culture, and traditions alive. As a Yup’ik teacher teaching in Inupiaq country, I found it inspiring that the NSBSD has programs in place where they were able to put an Inupiaq dictionary on to our computers (although after they upgraded the soft ware they didn’t want to work), and have a VIVA Inupiaq Language Program in place. However there have been complaints from Elders, and people in the community who say that the dialect on the programs is different from the ones that they speak in Barrow. Student in grades 1-5 have classroom computers on which they are capable of using different forms of technology, and software to complete their assignments. IPads are available for the Kindergarten students, but K3/K4 students are a bit too young to be allowed to use them. However they can be used with adult supervision. We have a Technology person in our school who helps teachers with technological issues. The population of our elementary school is 700. I’m not too sure how many teachers, and students there are throughout the NSBSD, but when we have in services, we tend to fill up a whole gym. It would be nice if we were given a day or more throughout the year to be trained in the technology that is offered other than the once a week training for an hour, and a half. I think the more time spend on teaching the teachers of the North Slope to utilize the programs on their computers would be more beneficial for everyone involved.

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vTBp0Z5GPeI

It’s amazing how much new information every week. I never would have imagined sketching electronics. I would love to attend a work shop on how to develop this art form. I could see so many different levels of students creating various forms of electronic sketches. It’s the first time that I’m actually excited to see a piece of soft ware that students would look at through any age, and be able to see technology through the eyes of a child. Once again interactive technology that would allow students to think outside the box to create something from nothing.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bring_your_own_device

To be able to Bring your own device to work would be something that I would be nervous to do. Especially if there was sensitive information or sites that our work would think is not appropriate. I would also be nervous about getting some kind of virus, and having it affect my personal as well as my work information, and or projects. When the new hospital opened in Barrow, I noticed that they were using mobile phone devices to send, and receive information. At first I was uncomfortable with it, I thought that they were rude to be texting while patients were being seen. Even in our village clinics, the health aides have to use computers to record patient information. I often ¬†wonder how they would manage if there were to be a virus in the system or no internet available because of the weather. If we were in urban areas where there are more technicians, and more accessible technology to do all that has to be done, then I’d feel more comfortable. If people were to bring their own devices, who decides whether or not the information is personal or classified? Makes me wonder what happens to the information that I put on my work computer.

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http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/Minecraft_in_education

It amazes me how much technology, and the ability to play or create games has changed over the past 20 years. I’m so glad to see that the games have become more interactive, and that children, parents, and teachers can take ownership of their gaming capabilities. 20 years ago, I told myself that I didn’t want to be addicted to gaming like how I saw other people spending their time on games. I avoided buying video games for my daughters only to find out that they know more about games than I do. I was surprised after asking one of my grandsons to show me how to play a game that my 6 year old also knew how to play Mine Craft. After watching them play, I tried unsuccessfully playing myself, but didn’t go very far. I was amazed at their knowledge on how to create their own worlds, and the different vocabulary that they used when playing. I also liked the fact that they had to use mathematics, and problem solving to build different buildings, their surroundings, and modes of survival. I would have never known that there were so many different options of things to choose from to create a world. To see a six year old get so excited about an “advanced” mine craft game was an eye opener to how much I’ve been missing all these years. I’m still not that excited about myself getting into gaming, but to see how much it engages children to think is an eye opener for me. Times sure have changed since, “Oregon Trail, Atari, and Mario Bros.”

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https://www.academia.edu/10311797/Open_Learning_in_K-12_Online_and_Blended_Learning_Environments

It’s so amazing to me how much our learning is changing. Up until I took this class, I never gave a thought to digital libraries. I sometimes wondered what happened to the information that we post on the internet either on social media or emails end up. I used to think that they some how magically disappeared. It is scary to think that what we write or what we post can be taken up by other people, and changed without our permission through Open Education Resources, if I understand that correctly. I never thought of the day that I would think of how much technology would change how we teach, the classes that we could take or how it would affect our learning. It’s nice to know that we now have the ability to get information at our finger tips. i wonder though who is responsible for keeping the students accountable for following standards, and how they would show that they met them? Perhaps through different mediums such as videos, pictures, and interviews. Other then having my first two online classes for the first time in so many years, my guess would be that there will always be an instructor on the other end to keep track of things.

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http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/3d-printings/

I think other than seeing one episode on Grey’s Anatomy this past spring, and the article on Makerspace a week or two ago, I never would have imagine 2D, and especially not 3D printing! Imagine the uses that we could have it for in the classroom. I think that would be something that would make students learning more fun. I can’t imagine what it would be like to make a 3D product of something that is historic or so expensive that we’d never get to see it in our lifetime. I can imagine how excited Elders in our community would be to be able to produce replicas of the old tools that they used for hunting, and gathering purposes, and sod houses that they used to live in.

http://3dprinting.com/news/the-palette-filament-feeding-system/

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https://uasemergtech.wordpress.com/2015/06/06

Ted Talk: Let’s Teach Our Kids to Code. Up until I watched this video, I had no idea of what this word, “code” meant. I could only think of the health field where they talk about coding. I’m assuming that the name of the person giving the speech was Ted. Ted said that if we could learn to read that we could learn to code. According to him coding opens up opportunities to learn many other things. It’s no surprise that I never heard of the Scratch website either where people can make interactive cards. I would have never thought about sending my Mom links for interactive Mother’s Day cards. His mom was 83 years old, and started learning how to code. We’re never too old to learn new things. It’s amazing to think that other countries such as Estonia, and the UK were thinking of making it a requirement to teaching coding skills to first graders. It sounds like this video is a couple of years old, and I’m sure that they have already taken steps to move towards that goal. I like the thought of how coding teaches math concepts to become real life concepts. The example Ted gave about showing Victor how to add variables into his game to keep score was genuine. As a person who struggles with math, and math concepts myself, I can see how this would have helped me as a struggling student. Victor may not grow up to become a computer programmer, but his opportunities are endless. As a person who is so new to technology, I could see how students now a days who are such experts when it comes to games, computer programs, texting, and all that other jazz that I’m still getting a handle on would be so comfortable to make their own programs that would, and could reflect their lives in the different regions that they live in.

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